Common triggers of depression {Depression Management}

depression managementMy goal in this article is to prepare and educate you on a few of the common triggers of depression and how to manage it.

Depression is considered the most dreaded condition of mankind.

What makes depression so awful is the sad fact that it is the one disease devoid of hope in the minds of many who suffer with this global epidemic.

Unlike debilitating diseases like arthritis, which shows it’s ugly face by causing pain, depression is a silent enemy afflicting millions every year.

These are not original thoughts on the subject of depression but are in fact documented peer-reviewed research proving the existence of a world of information kept under “lock and key” contributing to a sea of suffering and mental anguish.

You will soon discover information that will change your life and the life of your family, friends, and patients.

Biology

We still don’t know exactly what happens in the brain when people become depressed. But studies show that certain parts of the brain don’t seem to be working normally.

Depression might also be affected by changes in the functioning of certain chemicals in the brain.

Genetics

Researchers know that if depression runs in your family, you have a higher chance of becoming depressed. But genetics don’t fully explain why clinical depression occurs.

Gender

Women are about twice as likely as men to become depressed. No one’s sure why. The hormonal changes that women go through at different times of their lives may play a role.

Age

People who are elderly are at higher risk of depression.

That can be compounded by other factors, such as living alone and having a lack of social support.

Health Conditions

Chronic and disabling medical conditions that may have no cure can raise your risk of becoming depressed. These include:

  • Cancer
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Thyroid problems
  • Chronic pain

Trauma and Grief

Trauma such as violence or physical or emotional abuse — whether it’s early in life or more recent — can trigger depression in people who are biologically vulnerable to it.

Grief after the death of a friend or loved one is a normal emotion, but like all forms of loss, it can sometimes lead to clinical depression.

Changes and Stressful Events

It’s not surprising that people might feel sad or down during stressful times — such as during a divorce or while caring for a sick relative. Yet even positive changes — like getting married or starting a new job — can sometimes trigger a clinical depressive syndrome that is more than just normal sadness.

Medications and Substances

Many prescription drugs can cause symptoms of depression.

Alcohol or substance abuse is common in depressed people. It often makes their condition worse by causing or worsening mood symptoms or interfering with the effects of medications prescribed to treat depression.

 

Thyroid imbalance can cause anxiety, depression, cloudiness, weight gain, poor concentration in addition to cold and exercise intolerance, dry skin, and hair loss. Low thyroid function impacts the ability of cells to use energy (hence low body temp), metabolize cholesterol, and to properly use B vitamins for an important cellular process called methylation.

Thyroid dysfunction can cause or be the result of other bodily imbalances.

Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have about depression and thyroid function or to discuss this topic and your best health further at docsage@docsage.com.

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Be Your Best Health,

Dr. Sage Campione

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Source: WebMD and www.FunctionalMedicineUniversity.com

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